Case Study: 1-800-GOT-JUNK? Becomes a Successfully Crappy Brand

junk1

Blitz Magazine, March 2000

A freak storm hits. As you watch hail bounce off your Jaguar, you wish you had a garage.

Oh, wait. You remember that you do, in fact, have a garage. It’s just full of. Of…you can’t remember what it’s full of.

Determined to reclaim your garage, you call a charity, which says it’ll send a truck Monday, between 8:00 and 5:00. You spend your week-end sorting through mounds of old furniture, sports gear and broken gardening equipment. On Monday morning, you lug it all down to the bottom of your driveway and head to work, thoroughly pleased with yourself.

But when you get home from work, the heap is still there. You leave a message for the charity. No one calls back.

‘Next morning, you look in the phone book under ‘Trash Removal Services’. You call Guy With Truck, who says he’ll be there Saturday at 10:00 a.m. He can’t quote a price until he sees what needs to be removed. Your junk sits and waits; the city garbage men come on Wednesday, but ignore the silent plea for help.

Saturday, 4:00 p.m., Guy With Truck appears. His truck is filthy and so is he. He has one arm and one eye. Your neighbours call their dogs inside and lock their doors.

You have neglected to hide your Jag in your now-empty garage. Guy With Truck sees the Jag, sizes up your house and quotes you $600. You don’t care; you want your junk gone. You write him a cheque and watch him take two hours to load the stuff before chugging off in a cloud of exhaust.

This is not an exaggerated scenario. It happens all the time. But Vancouver entrepreneur Brian Scudamore has taken this unhappy situation and turned it into a multi-million-dollar enterprise.

In 1989, the 18 year-old Scudamore was working toward a commerce degree. At the end of his first year, he needed a summer job but couldn’t find one. Then he spotted Guy With Truck and thought ‘Hey…’.

He paid $700 for an old truck; $100 to have fliers and business cards printed. He didn’t want people to think he was a one-man operation, so he called himself ‘The Rubbish Boys’, and came up with the slogan ‘We’ll Stash Your Trash in a Flash!”. While his little brother stuffed mailboxes with fliers, Scudamore drove the lanes of the city’s west side. When he found an over-flowing garage, he knocked on the door and offered to remove the junk. By the time he returned to school, he’d made a $1700 profit.

Scudamore kept working at the business. By 1993, it was so successful, he decided to make junk removal his life. He incorporated, hired student drivers and invested in more trucks, all bearing the slogan and ‘Rubbish Boys: 738-JUNK.’ Between word of mouth and these mobile billboards, business took off. By 1995, revenues were $100,000.

junk7  junk2

This success had much to do with how Scudamore differentiated himself from Guy With Truck. He offered same-day service and promised to remove everything except toxic substances. Rather than charging a rate based on his perception of a client’s income, he provided a printed, pre-set pricing structure (from $35 for a mattress, to $339 for a full truckload).

Not only did the Rubbish Boys not show up late, they called 30 minutes before to confirm the appointment. Their trucks were spotless. They were clean-cut, polite university students wearing snappy blue and green uniforms. They cheerfully removed your junk, and then cleaned up after themselves, sweeping garages and driveways and/or raking the grass. They provided proper receipts and, a few days later, called to make sure you were happy with your service.

junk6By 1997, Rubbish Boys had 16 trucks, 45 high-season employees and revenues of $1 million. Scudamore was nominated Entrepreneur of the Year by Ernst & Young and the Business Development Bank of Canada. He was one of 11 BC firms to make Profit Magazine’s list of 100 Fastest-Growing Companies in Canada—its five-year growth rate of 1,169% put it at #74.

There were contributing factors to this success. In Greater Vancouver, residents are allowed just two bags of garbage per week. And practically every city block hosts renovating yuppies, most of whom don’t know where the nearest dump is, let alone have the requisite vehicle.

Another factor is that charities are increasingly selective about what they take. They get way too much junk and don’t get a break from the dump—some charities spend $20,000 a year on dumping fees. You may think you’re doing someone a favour when you give an old couch to the Salvation Army, but if it’s torn or broken or water-damaged, it’s going to the dump at a pricey $65/ton (the average truckload weighs 1.1 ton).

In addition, Vancouver has many commercials and residential buildings belonging to absentee owners. These buildings are operated by property management firms—professional organizations that don’t want Guy With Truck anywhere near their clients’ properties. Also, while dumpster rental is cheaper than Scudamore’s service, construction companies often find it more efficient to hire him. Now, half of his business is residential, half commercial.

Then there’s the staffing aspect. Junk removal is an April to October business—that’s when everyone cleans up. With commercial contracts, Scudamore still has work in the off-season, but his business is largely seasonal. Seasonal business can’t afford to hire guys who need salaries; they need to be staffed by people who want to work only from June to September.

“For the first three years, Rubbish Boys was a student-run operation—you had to be a student to be hired,” recalls Scudamore. “But by 1998, I realized that, while students were professional, clean-cut and polite, they had no business experience. We were growing and we needed people who knew about building a business.”

junk5Not wanting to abandon his students, Scudamore instituted STEP, the Student Training in Entrepreneurship Program. He recruited students, and then helped them create mini-franchises. They were fronted the requisite cash and provided with a partner, a truck and a route. They received a base wage and a share of the profits; they had to do their own sales and media relations. The most profitable students in each territory received scholarships of $500 to $1000. To date, 180 students have participated.

There was more method to this: Scudamore wanted proof that his operating system could be franchised. Rubbish Boys’ 1998 earnings were $1.3 million; Scudamore saw that there was no barrier to his company’s becoming the Federal Express of junk removal. He had built his brand, it was time to franchise.

The company name became 1-800-Got-Junk? (inspired by the ‘Got Milk?’ campaign). The owner of the 1-800-Got-Junk? telephone number was persuaded to relinquish it. A $30,000, 12-line call centre was installed. Scudamore invested $500,000 in consultants and technology, and perfected a franchise system that easily allowed expansion. Information packages were produced, ads were placed in franchising magazines, the word spread, people started to call. Now there are franchises in Seattle, Portland, Edmonton, Calgary and Toronto. Scudamore’s goal is to have franchises in 30 North American markets by 2003.

junk3The 1-800-Got-Junk? system is simple. Scudamore selects two or three candidates per territory, depending on its size. Successful candidates have to know their markets and have strong sales skills. They must pay $20,000 to the company then invest another $30,000 on leasing, staffing and out-fitting an office; and on acquiring, painting, insuring and staffing trucks. Scudamore does not want franchise owners driving their own trucks.

“We want people working on the business, not in it,” he says. “These franchises are about starting from scratch and using our system to build the business. As people see the trucks and get to know about the brand, they’ll call. In the meantime, we want our franchisees knocking on doors, making presentations to property management companies and staying focused on growth.”

In addition to training, promotional materials and business plans, franchisees receive their phone systems as part of the package.

Regardless of where customers are, when they dial 1-800-Got-Junk?, they get the Vancouver call centre. The centre takes all bookings, organizes drivers’ routes and e-mails the orders to the appropriate franchisee, who re-confirms pick-ups and takes it from there.

junk4Franchise owners also receive the company’s proprietary management system—Junkware, a software package that handles all areas of operations, from scheduling to accounting to marketing.

“All of this is done on our server, but we’re not playing Big Brother,” points out Scudamore. “Junkware is a coaching tool—we want our people to succeed.”

Franchisees pay an 8% royalty, plus another 7% for call centre services. Their gross profit should be 40%, their net 20%. Fixed costs vary by market but, for a $50,000 investment, franchisees enjoy minimal risk in a lucrative, seasonal cash business. And it’s worth it. The Toronto franchisee became the largest junk removal service in that megalopolis after four months of operation. His 1999 sales were $250,000 with two trucks; this year, he has six trucks, 20 employees and sales should exceed $1 million.

 All of this without anything resembling a sophisticated marketing or media program. While Scudamore plans to actively advertise one day, he has always preferred the inexpensive, face-to-face approach.

“Paid advertising has never given us the same return as the face-to-face sales,” he explains. “We’ve tried radio—it wasn’t worth it. We had a little more success with newspaper advertising, but it’s too expensive. We do decals and t-shirts; we’ll take part in home and garden trade shows, construction and renovation trade shows. We just stay out there and keep reaffirming the brand. For us, the most effective way of communicating is via our trucks, our fliers, word-of-mouth and media attention.”

Scudamore has received loads of media attention. He coaches franchisees on how to garner it, and he gets involved in community events. For example, when the community of White Rock was devastated by rain and mud last year, Scudamore’s staff went there to clean up. Scudamore also invented a program called PRIDE: People Removing I-Sores Dumped Everywhere, through which 1-800-Got-Junk? works with community volunteers to clean up littered areas.

Last year, the company posted a website (www.1800gotjunk.com or www.rubbishboys.com). The site gets about 1,000 hits a week, but few people book on-line, preferring to call.

The slogan ‘We’ll Stash Your Trash in a Flash!” slogan is long gone. Now, trucks carry the new phone number and the website address. Liberal distribution of bright, die-cut fliers and $10 or $20 TrashCash coupons remain a mainstay, as does old-fashioned cold-calling.

So Scudamore has taken the most simple of businesses and given it an efficient franchising system and an easily-remembered call-to-action phone number. To date, he and his staff have delivered 15 million pounds of junk to dumps and recycling depots. He has 20 full-time employees and 75 seasonal employees. Sales for 2000 should hit $4 million. And he has no competition. Or….?

“I do have competition,” he says. “The guy with the truck.”

 

Advertisements

Case Study: It’s Onward & Upward for Uniglobe Travel

uniglobe1

The airlines have slashed travel agent commissions; we’re supposedly in recession. ‘Tough times for travel agents? Not if they’re with Uniglobe Travel.

uniglobe10

You may recognize the name of U. Gary Charlwood, Chairman of the massively successful Century 21 Canada. The business philosophy of Mr. Charlwood (as everyone calls him), in a nutshell, and as his entrepreneurial history suggests, is ‘Sell, Sell, Sell, Service, Service, Service and Be Very Very Well-Organized.’ He also believes that, once you articulate your vision and give your staff the tools with which to carry it out, you should leave everyone alone to do their jobs.

After building his real estate operation into the force that it is, Mr. Charlwood knew that his philosophy, coupled with his co-operative consumer marketing methods, could be applied to other service industries; and he believed that an internationally-recognized consumer travel organization could succeed through strength in numbers of locations, and high sales volume. In 1980, he founded Uniglobe Travel International.

Today, Uniglobe is the world’s largest travel franchise company, with 1997 sales of $2.7 billion. It employs 6,000 people at 1,000 offices in 20 countries, with head office in Vancouver. It owns Uniglobe CruiseShip Centres and San Diego-based convention organizer Uniglobe Main Events. It was the only travel company recommended as a franchise buy by The Wall Street Journal’s 1998 National Business Employment Weekly Annual Listing and, in the travel industry, only American Express has higher unaided brand identification. Its first Middle East markets opened last year; it will next expand into Central and South America, the Far East, and Africa.

The reasons for Uniglobe’s success are varied, but basic.

First, it filled a niche. Any travel agency, of any size, is built on a core base of business accounts, and it used to be that only large corporations had access to the complete range of travel perks and services. Uniglobe specialized in providing big company services to small and mid-sized businesses (with 5-50 travelers). It now holds 100,000 corporate accounts; 70% of its business is corporate, but its goal is to increase its leisure business and bring the mix to 50-50.

uniglobe2Next, Uniglobe offers a superior franchisee support system. To be successful in this ultra-competitive field, travel agents need strong brand identification, technological support, access to professional training and development, back-office management controls, effective marketing plans, solid relationship with preferred suppliers and access to promotional initiatives. Uniglobe delivers it all, right down to free office automation. The high brand awareness is a big draw for potential franchisees, and Uniglobe spends $20 million annually on international brand identity, advertising, promotions, public relations and direct sales programs.

Another key to Uniglobe’s success is its commitment to a high level of customer service. Its research shows that consumers expect a professional agency to address four service categories: Cost Containment & Control, Experience & Expertise, Accessibility & Advanced Communications, and Reliability & Responsiveness. So Uniglobe gives people what they want. It guarantees the best possible value in all fares and constantly evaluates cost-management strategies, savings opportunities and spending patterns. Experience & Expertise are handled by Uniglobe’s franchise recruitment and selection process.

“We’re so well-known as a leader in both travel and franchising, that people looking at franchising automatically come across Uniglobe,” says Laurie Radloff, President of Uniglobe Travel Western Canada. “And when we’re looking at new markets, we’re careful in our recruitment. A lot of people today are dissatisfied with what they’re doing. We know that there’s great personal satisfaction in owning your own business, and we know that Uniglobe agents love what they do, so we do print and radio campaigns with the theme ‘Do What You Love’. We talk to the banks and chambers of commerce to see who’s successful in their areas; we look at existing agencies to see if there are people who we feel can represent our name. We never place a franchise for the sake of having an outlet—we want to make sure that our name and brand are handled properly and that we have the right cultural fit. There’s a very high level of trust among those using our name, so we have to have the right people.”

Who have to have money. “They do have to be properly capitalized, although we don’t cause them to buy any products,” continues Radloff. “They pay Uniglobe a royalty, starting at 10% for every dollar they earn in commission. As sales rise, that percentage declines. That royalty could be a little high, but that’s because Mr. Charlwood knows what level of support franchisees require. We often hear about franchisees of other companies who are unhappy with the level of support they’re getting from their franchisor but that’s because, financially, the franchisor can’t do more.”

Uniglobe provides professional training in sales, customer service, marketing and operations, as well as on-going support in business administration, sales development, financial controls, market research, strategic planning and supplier relations. All of this translates into better customer service, and the level of experience and expertise that customers want.

 uniglobe6

Consumers want accessibility? No problem. The Uniglobe Customer Commitments promise that phone calls will be answered by the third ring, that callers never hold longer than 30 seconds, and that every call is returned within the hour. You find yourself trying to tell the customs officer/janitor in Novosibirsk that you’re supposed to be in Newark? Uniglobe has a 140-language interpretation service. ‘Course, that shouldn’t happen anyway, because Uniglobe guarantees error-free reservations and 100% accuracy in documentation. There is a Lost Luggage Control System, a 24-hour Rescue Line and the promise that service complaints will be resolved within 48 hours, supplier complaints within 15 business days.

Technology is another important component at Uniglobe, which has its own software: Travel Manager, and Software for Agency Management. Also, Uniglobe Net News, an extensive agent Intranet, piggy-backs Uniglobe Travel On-Line, an Internet booking and information system which was launched three years ago.

uniglobe3 uniglobe5

With Uniglobe Travel On-Line, consumers can book car rentals, hotels and flights, choose seat assignments, order special meals, obtain street maps, book cruises and tours, research destinations and find restaurants, currency information, last-minute promotions and weather reports.

“The Internet travel segment is growing very quickly,” says Radloff. “Booking travel this way is a big leap of faith at first, and there’s no question that a well-trained travel consultant is the best value. But if a client’s on a plane at 2:00 a.m., and wants to make a reservation on his laptop for a 10:00 a.m. connecting flight, we have to be able to provide that service.”

Uniglobe is careful to see that this system does not exclude its agents. An income-splitting formula pays franchisees a referral fee, 10% of online revenue is distributed through a group fund, and another 10% goes into an advertising fund.

“The site is good for our agents too,” continues Radloff. “At 2:00 a.m., that client’s only other option is to call the airline to book that flight. This way, the agency gets a little commission and gets the data on the booking and can follow up with the client. The site gives clients 24-hour access; it gives agents a 24-hour office. Plus, you don’t have to be an existing Uniglobe client to use the online service, so agents gain access to new clients.”

Uniglobe Travel On-Line is a separate public company and its stock hasn’t done that well, but the site is coming along, with a booking-to-looking ratio of 1:74 and sales of $5 million to November 1998, as opposed to $1 million for all of 1997. And it’s a great system. But so is Microsoft’s Expedia, one of the web’s most popular travel sites. So, in November, Uniglobe entered into a joint-marketing agreement with Expedia. This accomplished two things—a tough competitor is now a partner, and Uniglobe has access to Expedia’s three million customers and is closer to attaining the aforementioned goal of a 50-50 leisure-business mix. (In the travel business today, leisure is the hot market—no matter how tight the economy is, seniors and Boomers will keep traveling.)

Cyber-competition is only one challenge facing travel agents. There are also increasingly complex bulk-purchasing and fare packages, frequent flyer programs and the ubiquitous fly-by-night operations which muddy the waters for reputable companies. Consumers now have so many choices that a successful travel agency has to give customers special reasons to come to it, and stay with it. Those reasons have to be brand loyalty and value-added products and services. Which have to be communicated through marketing, advertising and public relations.

The Uniglobe marketing plan is written following consultation with franchisees. Preferred supplier recommendations are then collected, and listened to. All travel agencies have preferred-supplier relationships; Radloff says that Uniglobe takes its relationships more seriously than does its competition. And these relationships are crucial to stretching the Uniglobe advertising budget. Uniglobe spends $1 million annually on straight advertising, but that budget is extended by as much as 40%, due to the fact that 75% of advertising is co-op (and most visuals are provided by suppliers).

uniglobe4 uniglobe8 uniglobe9

The plan includes four main marketing pushes per year; one or more could be on cruises, one could be the Caribbean in January, another on Europe in June—it depends on supplier input and on what key interest areas have been identified among travelers. The international quarterly campaigns come out of California; they are supplemented with regional, then local, campaigns. Most advertising is print; outdoor and telemarketing are not used. There are six to eight weeks of television each year, radio use is rising and direct mail is a constant, with 100,000 pieces mailed quarterly.

The non-Canadian markets handle their own advertising. Radloff says that, in Canada, the advertising focus is on offering holidays at destinations where the Canadian dollar will go the farthest.

“We sell on value, not on price. For example, people frequently say they want an inexpensive holiday and that they don’t care about their hotel, but that hotel becomes important when they get there. We can provide a nice hotel at a price they can afford because we use our clout and buying power to deliver quality products in a cost-effective manner. We also provide products like Rescue Line, Travel Manager and a preferred-rate hotel program called Key Cities—this is all extra value at no extra cost to the consumer.”

Uniglobe’s strategy for 1999 is to position itself as ‘The Navigator of Options’, with the goal of convincing consumers that Uniglobe agencies can best help them wade through the sea of travel options. Uniglobe’s corporate marketing uses the Uniglobe Travel Plan, a travel purchasing system which incorporates Uniglobe Travel On-Line and the Uniglobe Cruise Program. From the client’s perspective, it is a travel management and purchasing system; from the agent’s point of view, it is a sales kit with corporate proposal templates and a PowerPoint presentation.

“Our corporate marketing is mostly face-to-face,” says Radloff. “We have a professional, well-trained sales force and our salespeople are out knocking on doors, calling on clients, making presentations. No one at Uniglobe waits for the phone to ring—they’re out closing sales and getting the business.”

One very important aspect of Uniglobe’s communications activities is positioning. Not positioning as in ‘We’re A Really Good Travel Service,’ but as in ‘We’re A Really Good Travel Service and We’re On Your Side!’.

“Since its inception, our focus has been on building the Uniglobe name into the most widely-recognized name in travel—to be to travel what Campbell’s is to soup,” explains Radloff. “So while the competition advertises price, we talk about other things. People like to spend their money locally, so we talk about the fact that Uniglobe’s agencies are local but have global clout. But, to take that name recognition further, and to inspire confidence, we’ve positioned ourselves as problem-solvers and as the advocate for the traveling consumer.”

Two years ago, when Canadian Airlines had its near-death experience, Uniglobe was the only travel company that leapt into the fray, with Radloff appearing on Canada AM and various radio programs to talk about how having only one Canadian airline would not be in the best interest of consumers because of the negative impact on service, pricing and availability. While we assume that there’s no point in going to Hawaii because of the exchange rate, Uniglobe is out telling the media that the Asian market for Hawaii has withered, hoteliers are under tremendous pressure, air space has tripled and fares are down from $600 to $99. Every time a travel scam pops up, so does someone from Uniglobe, educating consumers about what to watch for. And, thought his may be stretching things a bit, after the recent Carnival Cruises on-board fire, Uniglobe became the exclusive dealer of Evacuate, a smoke-hood-in-a-can which provides 20 minutes of clean air. 

All of this is advocacy, it is brand-building, it is confidence-inspiring PR. And PR is a huge component of marketing at Uniglobe, where every message sent to the public is, quite literally, identical. This is achieved through the Agency News Media Program, a PR-Program-In-A-Box created by Uniglobe’s PR firm, Vancouver’s Verus Group.

“Uniglobe is one of the more enlightened corporations I’ve worked with, in that Mr. Charlwood has always instinctively understood that marketing and PR should be inextricably linked,” says Verus Group president Wayne Hartrick. “In some organizations, the PR and marketing functions are clearly delineated, which is a shame because there should be a coordinated strategy between them so that every dollar and every employee hour spent is leveraging their combined impact.”

To that end, Uniglobe’s four annual marketing pushes are supported by PR pushes on the same subjects. If the company is marketing cruises, Verus writes releases on cruises. It then sends the releases to national publications, then to all franchisees, who send them to their local papers. If a local paper asks a franchisee to write an article, it’s ready to go—Verus has already written it; the franchisee just changes the by-line. Promotion may be the intention, but it doesn’t carry the aroma of advertorial; publications passing it on to their readers do so because it’s useful, helpful information.

“This method has helped our agents become known in their communities as experts in their field,” says Radloff. “It is an extremely cost-effective way of achieving our marketing objectives, because it’s exposure that brings with it a credibility that you won’t get if people know you’ve paid for it.”

As mentioned, Uniglobe’s Agency News Media Program is literally in a box. It is a kit which includes articles and news releases on the subjects determined by the marketing plan, plus a 30-minute video, and a workbook that teaches franchisees how to deal with journalists and earn credibility in their communities. New franchisees come to Vancouver for PR training, then Verus Group staffers coach agency owners over the phone, encouraging them to work the program, and motivating them to build their profiles in their locations. If that sounds like a pain for both sides, it evidently was, initially.

uniglobe7

“The program takes patience and commitment,” says Hartrick. “It’s a challenge to get everyone to do PR because people are busy and there’s always another priority. And they get discouraged—we’ll issue a release, the franchisee can’t find an interested reporter and gives up. We encourage them to try other things, show them how they can become regular columnists and how to make presentations to corporate and community groups. This program of encouragement is crucial. Eight years ago, we just distributed the kits and had a 10% implementation rate. Now, with daily contact, we have a 62% implementation rate, and it’s climbing.

“This is all about credibility. If you’re writing in the local paper, or being quoted by your local media, your other marketing activities are met with less resistance. Uniglobe’s combined programs are generating 400,000 impressions per day from print alone, and these impressions carry the extra impact of having grass-roots credibility.

“Our research shows that most consumers see travel as a problematic experience,” concludes Hartrick. “We make sure that Uniglobe gets its name in the media for the right reasons—because it’s solving problems for people and providing useful information as well as quality, high-value products. The whole principal behind this, after all, is to do something well and get credit for it.”

 

Blitz Magazine, January 1999

 

 

 

Case Study: Subway Wraps Up Its Region

subway1

A lot of British Columbians think that Subway is a BC company. They see Subway outlets while vacationing in other countries and just assume that Subway is another BC firm that has done well.

But Subway is not a BC company. It was founded in Connecticut, in 1962. Today, there are 13,000 Subway restaurants in 68 countries—1,300 in Canada. It is the second-largest franchise in the world, next to McDonald’s, in front of 7-11 and Century 21; and it is the largest franchise in BC.

In 1987, Gerry Lev, then a Calgary franchise consultant, discovered the Subway concept at a trade show. There were 1,000 Subways worldwide, none in Western Canada. In 1988, Lev founded Subway Developments of BC, and the division celebrates its 10th anniversary with 218 stores. And, out of all Subway divisions, and in terms of sales, the BC division is at the top, leading by up to 25%. If that lead is narrowing, it’s because BC has become the model for divisions which are following its lead and catching up.

How can this be? There are only 3.9 million British Columbians. But they eat a lot of Subway sandwiches—400,000 a week, putting annual sales at $90 million.

The answer lies in a potent combination of organizational ease, corporate savvy and media communications, all boosted by the intrinsic qualities of the BC lifestyle.

In the first place, as Lev explains, Subway restaurants are easy to own. “When you buy a franchise, you buy an operating system which has been perfected over time. One of the hallmarks of our system, and our success, is KISS—Keep it Simple, Stupid. The recipes are simple, procedures and operations are simple. There’s no cooking involved, so we don’t need thousands of dollars worth of equipment. The cost to open a Subway franchise is $140,000—a McDonald’s franchise can run from $700,000 to $1 million.

Secondly, Subway has benefited from a lack of competition. “In 1988, there were no sandwich chains in BC,” continues Lev. “There were sandwich stores, in office buildings, closed in the evenings and on week-ends. There was no alternative to burgers, and Subway sandwiches quickly became the perfect alternative, but with the convenience and economy offered by fast food.”

 subway2

The price of a Subway sandwich begins at around a dollar and, although the corporation’s research shows that portability is not a major factor overall, it’s probably a bigger factor with BC consumers, who appreciate the fact that they can buy their lunch on their way to work or school, or stow one in a knapsack to eat at the beach or on the mountain.

 “Freshness is our biggest selling point, value is number two,” continues Lev. “But what brought Subway to the forefront is the fact that our sandwiches are not pre-made. People watch their meal being made—precisely to their instructions. The Subway bread is baked in front of customers, which is another selling point; and there’s our traditional ‘U-Gouge’, which is a way of cutting the bread so the contents of the sandwich won’t fall out.

“Variety is another selling point. We have something for everyone—meat, vegetarian, low-fat—and one of the best breakfast sandwiches in the industry. But, getting back to the KISS formula, we’re in the business of appealing to the masses. Some Subway stores offer soup and salads, and we have items like potato chips. But our business is selling sandwiches.”

The Subway benefits are not difficult to communicate to a receptive public—everybody loves a sandwich. The big challenge has always been budget. Subway collects advertising funds from franchisers, and that money is spent on ‘national’ (North American) advertising, care of Chicago agency Hal Riney & Partners. That agency works with a corporate board, and a franchise board, while keeping everyone moving in the same direction—no mean feat, considering the company’s growth: from 10 restaurants to 1,000 in the first 20 years, to 11,000 a decade later, to 13,000 six years after that.

In addition, each division has its own advertising agency. The marketing plan comes from head office in Connecticut, Riney develops is nationally, and the local agencies worth with their own franchisee boards to develop the plan locally. In BC, the agency that is i2i Advertising & Marketing, and its annual budget is $4.5 million. That’s not much for the ultra-aggressive fast food industry, but it’s way more than the franchise had in 1991, when i2i partners Stuart Ince and Cam Iverson began with Subway.

“Back then, Subway BC was 14 stores and the franchisees had just pooled enough money to hire professional help,” recalls Iverson. “That amount was below $100,000, so the account didn’t interest many agencies. But we knew the chain would take off here. It fit the west coast lifestyle, and it fit well in terms of competing against other fast food chains.”

The BC division took off in 1993, when the franchisees decided to go beyond the 2.5% of sales which they were contracted to put into advertising and begin an Additional Funds Program, becoming the first Subway division to do so.

The extra budget immediately shot up our presence—and sales,” says Iverson. “The sub sandwich is part of the eastern deli mentality. With the extra money, we were able to make the Subway sandwich a BC thing.”

Therein lies the key to Subway BC’s success. “We made ourselves a BC company, and part of the BC community,” Iverson continues. “This wasn’t strategy—our franchisees are BC people and they want to be part of their communities and do things they can be proud of. So, aside from spending advertising dollars wisely, we get involved in events and promotions at a very local level—and it’s that community involvement which explains why so many people think that Subway’s head office is here.”

 subway3 subway5

Subway BC is big on philanthropy. It raised $35,000 for Canuck Place (at the beginning, before the band-wagon effect kicked in). Ditto with AIDS Vancouver. Its Heroes for Hunger program gave a free sandwich to anyone who delivered a Food Bank donation. Every day, Subway feeds supporters of something: the Terry Fox Run, the Children’s Festival, the March of Dimes, Boy Scouts, the BC Boys Choir, Minor League hockey and Little League baseball. It supports scholarships, and it bought the ‘Shout No!” program, working with police and schools on child safety.

 subway6

These are, of course, promotions. But community involvement is Subway BC policy, and philanthropic promotions stretch advertising budgets. “We don’t do many things in a huge way, and we never pick causes for profile,” says Lev. “Most international companies don’t get involved with local figure skating clubs, and we don’t get the publicity that others get, but we reach thousands of people by doing a lot of little things.”

Subway has also been smart about advertising. This has not always been easy, considering the fact that half of its radio spots and all of its television ads are created in Chicago. It took a while for US creative teams to realize that Canadian and American sensibilities aren’t the same.

“It used to be a horrendous problem,” recalls Lev. “I spent a lot of time saying ‘No, not in Canada.’ I don’t have to do that anymore. Now, they know Canada well and we get Canadian versions of everything.”

Once i2i has the marketing plan, it can do what it likes—another success ingredient.

“The BC franchisees are left alone in terms of advertising and promotions,” says Iverson. “And they’ve been aggressive at putting together deals which build Subway’s presence far beyond the dollars they have to spend. We have to work harder to push media dollars into creating image, so we’ve become involved in loads of cross-promotions and have forged strong relationships with media partners. Those promotions have been a large factor in putting us ahead of other Subway divisions.”

Subway runs ten major promotions a year. Its biggest is the annual ‘Survive in Style Sweepstakes’. The concept was a small part of the national marketing plan, but i2i worked with Global Television to make it fit the BC culture, and it took off.

“The national promotion was about fast food survival tips,” says Iverson. “We made it about what you need to survive in BC. We have a true partnership with Global in that we plan it together and tie it in with Global’s Sports Page. Then we give away vehicles, scooters, mountain bikes, cellular phones, vacations–$100,000 worth of prizes. It’s now bigger than most of Subway’s national promotions.”

Another major promotion is the chance to win a trip to the Stanley Cup Finals—essential, of course, for the all-important 18-34 male demographic. “Sports are very important to us and we don’t have the money to participate in the TSN buy,” continues Iverson. “The Stanley Cup promotion lets us tie ourselves to hockey without becoming involved with a team. We’re perceived as being sports-related, even though, at the professional level, McDonald’s is much more invested. We’ve done a little guerrilla marketing…I guess we’ve stolen some thunder.”

(In that vein, one famous tactic is the use of the Subway plane. If Subway can’t afford to sponsor an event, it rents a plane, attaches a banner and repeated flies over the event. After seven years, this remains one of Subway BC’s most successful marketing tools.)

Another smart move was looking at the competition and going in the opposite direction.

“Corporately, our market is 18-49, and that is what our media buys target, but we stay very aware of the 12-17 customer,” says Iverson. “McDonald’s targets families. Teens don’t want to be where families are. So we’ve presented Subway as the cool place to go. We aligned ourselves with the younger radio stations; the Z95—Subway sticker prize campaign was extremely successful. And we created the Sub Dude and got involved with snowboarding at the beginning of snowboarding—there was a time when no self-respecting snowboarder would be caught without a Subway sticker on his board. Teens love us—not only is a Subway sandwich a cool food to eat, but their parents don’t mind. Now, it’s kind of a cult food.”

As far as Lev is concerned, the Subway market is anyone with teeth. “It’s anyone who can eat a sandwich. BC has the largest senior population in Canada and seniors are concerned about blood sugar, fat and cholesterol. And children are the grown-ups of tomorrow. But we don’t have the funds to go after individual markets.”

So individual markets are targeted quietly. “A child’s choice is the determining factor of where parents go, but kids want toys,” explains Lev. “If Dairy Queen advertises a toy promotion, it’ll get the families. We can’t advertise that way, so we have a Kids Pack program—a school lunch with a sandwich, drink, cookie and toy. As a result, we feed more BC elementary students than anyone else.”

 subway4

In BC, more than any another Subway region, women are a larger market: 50%. “Between 7:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m., we get men; that’s when we sell the foot-longs with double meat and cheese,” says Iverson. “But at lunch, 60% of sales are to women. At the beginning, we had to focus on the 18-34s, then we built in the 12-17s, then we spread out to the 12-49s. Now, half of our customers are women. So we’ve broadened the net further. We run ads on female stations like KISS and QMFM, focusing on four-inch sandwiches, the lighter lunch, the sandwiches with six grams of fat or less.”

Subway heavily promotes the latter, but the low-fat aspect adds irony to any discussion involving the fast-food industry. “North Americans are fatter than ever, fries and chocolate are the top-selling foods, steakhouses are North America’s fastest-growing restaurant category and Wendy’s salads are gone,” says Lev. “So while it’s great that people see Subway sandwiches as an alternative to foods that they deem to be fattening, I’m not sure that they care about fat. People may think more about nutrition, but whether they act on it is a different matter. It’s just that the sandwich connotation is more positive.”

Connotation is another important point. “We’re careful to position ourselves in the sandwich category because of the submarine connotation,” says Iverson. “The submarine is rooted in the Northeastern US Italian-American community, where it’s a mainstay. In BC, before Subway came here, submarines were seen as something that fat men ate while they watched TV. Nobody had heard of a meatball sandwich. Or a foot-long steak-and-cheese with Marinara sauce. We communicated a different connotation for BC. Now, we sell a lot of those sandwiches.”

“Kentucky Fried Chicken is now KFC and McDonald’s calls its burgers ‘sandwiches’,” adds Lev. “Subway has never used the word ‘submarine’. As we’ve built our brand in BC, the focus has been on sandwiches, and the fast, inexpensive made-to-order meal. We’ve always promoted our 6” sandwiches—never our foot-longs. The 6” sandwiches fit with BC eating habits, and we won and R&D award when we devised 4” deli rounds, because we created a food that was appropriate for our market.”

All Subway restaurants sell 16 sandwiches—12 corporate, four local. The latter are created by franchisees, and this allowance is yet another reason for Subway’s success.

“The franchisees can choose what they sell, as long as it’s on Subway bread,” explains Lev. “And there’s no test kitchen, anywhere. We try things. If they work, great. If sandwiches don’t move, they come off the menu.”

i2i has used this flexibility for the highly-successful Sub of the Month promotion. “The freedom to create menu deviations has been a real bonus—and franchisees’ input is listened to,” says Iverson. “If head office were to introduce a sandwich which the franchisees knew no one in BC would eat, they could opt out. And we can push sandwiches which fit the BC culture. For example, we knew that chicken would work here, and that a Caesar salad would work here, so we helped develop the Kickin’ Chicken Savoury Caesar. It took off and became a national campaign. And the Sub of the Month program allows us to regularly present a different reason to come to Subway. It’s not rocket science, but it gives us product news and drives traffic.”

The two other Subway divisions which are catching up to BC are Alberta and Minnesota. They too have followed the formula of becoming part of their communities’ fabric, while staying with the national plan.

“A lot of other markets ran their own programs and, in the process, created too many Subway faces,” continues Iverson. “National ads would say one thing, local ads would say another, promotions would say something else. We create our own advertising and promotions, but we stay close to the national campaigns. So the advertising is different, but there’s always something that ties it together.”

Iverson says that the real credit goes, of course, to Gerry Lev and the Subway franchisees.

“Gerry’s progressive—he knew he needed to do more than just sell franchises. He’s a great communicator, he keeps everyone informed, brings in educational speakers. His franchisee support system has really helped the growth of this division. And the franchisees put a lot of energy into staying ahead of the pack. They’ve been willing to take risks and increase their spending. So we have BC people who have worked hard to put a BC face on an American corporation. And sales are way higher than in any other division. It’s an impressive accomplishment.”

Blitz Magazine, May 1998

 

 

 

Case Study: Toyota Turns Itself Around

toyota3

 

A new car, they say, is the second-largest purchase you’ll make in your lifetime. ‘They’ (the experts) also say that what you look for is quality, dependability and reliability, or ‘QDR’.

You want an attractive, safe, comfortable vehicle that won’t require much maintenance and will rarely break down. And unless you’re concerned about status and aren’t concerned with cash flow, you will look for a vehicle which offers a high QDR rating at the lowest possible price.

Until two years ago, Toyota was at a disadvantage on the latter point. While its QDR ratings have always been high and while, in BC, Toyota has always been the number-one selling import, Toyota vehicles were a little too pricey for many people.

Then, according to Garth Gilson, Toyota’s Manager of Vehicle Sales for BC, a number of things happened.

“Corporately, the company went through a transition. We re-engineered our way of thinking and we looked at our production and distribution systems to find efficiencies which we could translate into better pricing. We re-designed the Corolla and Camry, we introduced the RAV4 into the sport utility market and we re-introduced the Sienna into the van market. We’ve been able to put added value into our vehicles and offer new, high-value vehicles without an increase in price. That has made us more competitive with the domestics.”

Meanwhile, as Toyota became more efficient and improved quality while holding the line on pricing, the price of domestic vehicles went up. Now, the price spread between the high-quality Toyota imports and the comparable domestics is vastly reduced. As a result, for the first time, Toyota has the number-one selling intermediate car in North America (the Camry has displaced the Ford Taurus). In Canada, Toyota’s 1997 sales rose by 18%. In industry terms, that’s huge—anything over 10% is impressive. But in BC, the 1997 Toyota sales increase was a whopping 23%. This is due, in large part, to effective media communications.

“I’d like to think that the BC sales increase can be credited to communication and strategy,” says George Cruickshank, Account Director for Toyota BC Dealers at Glennie Stamnes Strategy, which has been the dealer association’s AOR for the past eight years. “With all of these developments taking place, we completely re-worked the advertising strategy. We said ‘we’ve now got a quite a horn to blow, so let’s really blow it. We’ve got a great new story for the consumer, terrific new vehicles, all these market advantages…we decided to let the vehicles do the talking and let the advantages dictate. We changed the way we looked at the business.”

98RAV4 toyota1 

There are 33 Toyota dealers in BC and, when compared with other Toyota zones, the BC zone holds the largest market share within its zone. Toyota’s advertising operates at three levels—corporate, dealer and dealer association. The latter is a voluntary association, overseen by eight director/dealers who approve the association’s annual $4 million advertising expenditure. Gilson says that, while individual dealers are free to advertise whatever and however they like, they have found that the association campaigns are strong enough that it’s in their best interest to stay with the group.

“It makes more sense. It gives them a bigger voice and much more impact. All the players can tell the same story. It’s not an exact science—dealers have different opinions, approaches, budgets. But it’s a lot more effective when dealers work within the association campaigns.”

Dealer communication and participation is essential to the success of Toyota’s marketing efforts. You may think that this is an obvious point, but Gilson says that not all car companies are as conscientious as they could be in this area. At Toyota, paying attention to those who actually sell the vehicles makes good business sense. It makes for happier dealers, more profitable dealerships, and a stronger flow of information from customers.

“We need to know what consumers are saying. This market is very fluid and, as a manufacturer, we have to embrace change. And change is brought about by shifts in consumer tastes. Over the course of a year, consumer tastes in everything from vehicle styles to colours can change significantly. Equipment goes in and out of fashion very quickly. We conduct a lot of market research, but we depend on our dealers to keep us abreast of trends.”

toyota4 toyota5

While Toyota stays in touch with its dealers, Cruickshank says that Glennie Stamnes focuses on the sales managers. “We’ve worked hard at building relationships with the sales managers. They’re at the front line of the business and have to be involved. We need to know what they’re hearing from customers. What consumers compare our vehicles against, what it is about our vehicles that stands out. So we meet with the managers regularly, hold focus groups with them and present creative to them before it goes out. We go to the dealerships to make sure that p.o.p. materials are placed properly—which is unusual because many dealer associations regularly put out campaigns with no dealership execution. This interaction makes a big difference. It also helps that this is the best dealer group I’ve worked with. They respect each other, they agree to a program, they get behind it, they execute it.”

A change in execution was a large part of the strategic shift made over the last two years. The traditional media mix of TV, radio and newspaper has been heavily augmented by outdoor buys—mainly exterior bus kings, which are now a key element of Toyota’s sales events.

Those sales events also last longer. “Traditionally, automobile advertising was done through one-month promotions,” says Cruickshank. “Last year, we drew our promotions to two and three months. With one-month promotions, by the time consumers heard about them, and then arrived to take advantage of them, the promotions were over. Consumers were getting fed up. Now, the media has time to kick in and consumers have time to get to the offer. From the acceptance stand-point, it’s better for the dealer and the consumer. There are also no breaks between sales events any more—Toyota doesn’t want to take a break from selling cars, why should there be time between financing and leasing offers?”

Two other consumer annoyances were dispensed with. Toyota buyers can now get 60-month financing on new vehicles—48 months used to be the limit. And Toyota BC Dealers now advertise only what they have on the ground, as opposed to advertising vehicles which are scheduled to come in.

“There are two reasons for this,” continues Cruickshank. “We have to help dealers move what they have on their lots. But it often happens that a car company launches a new car, it promotes it, customers come in to buy and the cars aren’t there yet. That makes people angry. There is no point in spending advertising dollars if you haven’t got the goods to sell and you’re going to tick off your customers.”

Glennie Stamnes also did away with another auto industry practice—the adherence to seasonality. “Traditionally, the belief was that no one bought cars in January, February or March, what with Christmas bills and tax time coming up. In fact, business may be slower during these months, but people are still buying cars. So we’ve advertising aggressively during those months, and that’s where we saw growth last year.”

Creatively, dealer testimonials were replaced by light humour mixed with an increase in the provision of factual information about pricing, quality and financing. And, for the first time, notes Cruickshank, all creative was adapted for the Asian community.

“BC has a large Asian population which is incredibly important to Toyota, which is the number-one name plate in that ethnic group. So all of our creative is reflected in the Asian community. We’ve become involved with the Chinese New Year celebrations and the International Dragon Boat Festival. We buy Asian media and tailor the creative for it. We also tailor the offers. The Asian community tends to buy cars—they’re less likely to lease. So where we’ll offer the general public a leasing program, we’ll offer the Asian community a purchase program.

toyota6 toyota7 

“The goal of all advertising over the last two years has been to build on QDR and wrap it up with value and affordability. Price has always been the biggest hurdle for us. But now we can find a better balance. Instead of trying to get people to buy an expensive product, we can now come out and say that, in addition to their excellent QDR ratings, Toyota vehicles are more affordable than ever. We’ve had a lot of information to communicate, but we’ve done it. And our sales increases are strong and our dealers are happy.”

And Toyota’s happy. In BC, its market share is 8%. Nationally, its share is 7% (as compared to Ford’s, which is 21.6%). But The Big Three is now The Big Five—General Motors, Ford, Toyota, Honda, Chrysler. In 1997, for the first time, Toyota sold over 100,000 cars in a calendar year (106,000, including Lexus). Demand is up. The company has taken an aggressive attitude, setting the goal of a 10% market share by the year 2000.

“Toyota already had a lot of loyal, satisfied customers,” concludes Cruickshank. “But with the new price points and new vehicles, it has opened itself to a whole new consumer segment. It has never been in a stronger position to make a serious impact on its marketplace.”

Gilson is a little more cautious. “The industry itself can only grow so big. In our effort to reach our 10% market share, we realize that we have to retain our existing customers, while looking at ‘conquest customers’—those who are driving something else. We’re dealing with educated consumers in a highly-competitive market and we can’t afford to get lost.

“But our advertising has been very effective. The strategy has worked, and I think our sales show that you can’t under-estimate the value of strong advertising.”

Blitz Magazine, March 1998